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A personal account of being in an accident as a professional supercross rider

Cole was having an excellent season, holding second in the points, when he joined his teammate Ken Roczen on the sidelines for at least the rest of Monster Energy AMA Supercross with a fractured pelvis and tailbone. And get well soon from everyone at Racer X Illustrated. We will get our first glimpse at Antonio Cairoli vs.

Webb passed Roczen in a corner and then Roczen tried to get him back in the next turn, came in hot, lost control, and looped out. So what happened from your perspective in San Diego?

Mike Alessi

I had a good start, and then I got pushed to the bales and stalled. I started getting into a groove and came through, and I caught him from a pretty good ways back. I felt like I was faster, so I made the pass before the whoops. I looked at the video, and it looked like he stopped or tried to stop, got off balance or whatever, and took us both out.

Rider Medical

At first, before I saw the video, I thought he hit me, but watching the video after the race I saw it was his bike that took me out. I was lucky to be all right—was still able to get 19th or 18th or whatever. It definitely sucked, because I had won the heat race, but it was my fault because I stalled and was back there.

Do you think the contact he made, you were fine with? He was definitely trying to pass me back, for sure. Did you see his arm after the crash?

  1. If 4-year-old Kenny took a spill and wanted help picking up his bike, Papa would shout from afar that he needed to do it himself. Like a kid being power-bounced on a trampoline, Roczen was helpless.
  2. Let's see how a different track impacts the Triple Crown format tomorrow night.
  3. Like a kid being power-bounced on a trampoline, Roczen was helpless. And get well soon from everyone at Racer X Illustrated.
  4. He says with the Triple Crown and the shorter races, the track might not take as much of a beating, but it's still "going to get hammered.
  5. After scoring only one more top three overall finish a second place during the tenth of twelve rounds Alessi finished the series fifth overall. He was able to score consistent points over the next ten rounds and finished a respectable fifth overall.

His bike actually hit my head. I just heard somebody on my inside, the throttle wide open, and then I got hit. At first I thought things had got very crazy. I was dazed, too. I was just trying to get my bike, and my bars were about to fall off! Did you hear him coming through the whoops? Obviously I heard him, and I think he even kind of gave me a rev to kind of spook me a little bit.

I hit that top line; the line that he was in was the line I always hit. So I knew he was going to try to make the pass back, so I went a little higher. Same Format, Better Track Weigandt Another test of the Triple Crown format this weekend, and most likely a better one, because the track at Anaheim a personal account of being in an accident as a professional supercross rider was universally not loved by the riders.

In contrast, this track in Atlanta is a tough one. It's tight, it's busy, and it will also likely get rutted. Right now, on press day, the dirt is exceptionally soft and fluffy in spots, and I was amazed how deep the ruts got after just 14 riders logged some laps today.

The dirt will likely be harder by tomorrow, but when you put full gates on the track at race intensity, it's going to get hammered. That's going to create the type of separation the riders wished they had at Anaheim 2. Jason Weigandt Tickle is especially happy with this track because the ruts are his strength. He says with the Triple Crown and the shorter races, the track might not take as much of a beating, but it's still "going to get hammered.

Overall, the riders all told me this track is busy—more jumps and turns than usual. Justin Hill told me it's very similar to the JGR test track, and that's not a coincidence.

When JGR rebuilt their track this off season, Hill told them to make it busy, because that takes more energy and would make for better training. That's the type of track we have here. Let's see how a different track impacts the Triple Crown format tomorrow night. At the eighth round of this year's series in Tampa, he was able to catch up with Mark Barnett and Jeff Stanton, getting his 17th win in the 450SX class.

Stanton's 17 "Six-Time" raced in the premier class between 1987 and '94. He took part in 113 races in all during his career. He got his maiden victory in his 26th race in 1989, at the Atlanta SX. Stanton took his last win in his 99th race in 1993 Las Vegas. Among the champions who have at least three titles, Stanton has the fewest victories. His calling card was consistency, not domination.

Barnett participated in 91 races in all. He got his very first win in his ninth race in 1979 Los Angeles. He would celebrate his last victory in his 86th race in 1985 Atlanta.

Mark Barnett would get 16 wins with Suzuki and one win with Kawasaki—the last one. Barnett's 17 successes were enough to get one championship title.

Tomac's 17 Within two rounds, Eli Tomac caught up to three former supercross premier-class champions. Compared to the latter two, Tomac was able to reach the 17th victory sooner.

  • He was partially sponsored by the age of 13, when he skipped the 125cc class and went straight to a 250, which in Germany meant he was racing against adults;
  • Because he was born into motorsports, says Roczen, racing dirt bikes was inevitable;
  • As the doc tells it;
  • Moments before the start of the first moto of the 450 class at Washougal, Team MotoConcepts Racing MCR crew member Jeff Alessi pointed a green laser light directly at the eyes of competitor Ryan Villopoto as he prepared for the start of the race;
  • The sport of motocross my own personal this is why the road 2 recovery foundation is a dedicated program to help ama professional motocross and supercross;
  • Overall, the riders all told me this track is busy—more jumps and turns than usual.

But in contrast to them and also to BayleTomac still does not have any championship titles in the supercross premier class just yet. Eli got his 17th success in his 72nd race.

Truthfully speaking, there are fewer beautiful places to begin another term of racing than the scenic Villa de Angostura, a short distance from the border with Chile.

The volcanic earth terrain of a fast and jumpy track means this round is something of a unique test on the MXGP calendar; the ground is sandy but thicker with a hard base. It has been known to bamboozle riders in the past in terms of setup, traction, and feeling, but those who find grip and groove tend to wax lyrical about the place. Later this afternoon, Youthstream and the FIM will hold their traditional opening press conference and could well confirm or dispel rumors that this will be the last Grand Prix at Neuquen for the time being.

Gossip has passed through the paddock that the championship could move north, closer to the capital, Buenos Aires, or even to the city of Cordoba—a hotspot of motorcycling in the country and location of the finish arch of the 2018 Dakar Rally less than two months ago.

Practice and qualification gets underway tomorrow with a splendid weather forecast, and there is a feeling of relief around the facility that most of the European teams managed to escape Storm Emma that is coating great areas of the continent in white and with subzero temperatures. Argentina should see the first episode of the anticipated title dispute between Red Bull KTM duo Antonio Cairoli seeking a tenth world championship and 2017 runner-up and Ironman National vanquisher Jeffrey Herlings.

The Dutchman won the MX2 class in 2016 here, while Cairoli has had relatively little success in Argentina, taking just one podium finish in 2015. Next up is German Max Nagl, winner of the inaugural round in 2015 and two motos and now facing an interesting challenge by heading the small Italian marque TM.

Could Sunday be a landmark date for the team? Hunter Lawrence, in his second year racing MX2, will be a rider to watch this season.

The 18-year-old Australian is attempting his second GP year and won two of the last three rounds in 2017. He is also in a hurry with the coming 19 rounds, 38 motos, and 57 starts qualification heats representing a narrow window for his MX2 goals before he moves to America. But not everyone will be there. For one, there's the injured Tim Gajser, the 2016 MXGP champion, who broke his jaw in a crash during a preseason race. Still, he is one of the greatest figures in the history of Grand Prix motocross.

Suzuki First Stefan was a racer, then he became a manager, and then a team owner. Everts debuted in the 125cc class for Bieffe Suzuki in 1989 and he raced until 2006, with only 1999 being out with a broken leg during his brief tenure with the old Husqvarna.

After his racing career, Everts continued as a manager. Then he became the boss of the factory Suzuki team between 2016 and '17, challenging for world titles. After Suzuki's surprising decision, Everts has decided to take off a year in 2018.

He mainly wants to spend his time with his son, Liam, and his own fledgling career. Even when Kris Keefer, my co-host on the PulpMX Show, told me he had been testing with the company and it was a legit bike, I still had my doubts.

Then I rode one. The lack of parts moving inside the motor makes it seem light. There are four ignition maps on a personal account of being in an accident as a professional supercross rider bike, and I enjoyed three; the ultra-aggressive map four was too much for me—it really pulled hard! The fact that all you can hear is your chain slap and people talking alongside the track is also super weird.

The other OEMs that pay into pro SX and MX will eventually have to play nice and allow the Alta into their playground, but when you do allow them in, what class are they in?

The other companies probably all have Altas now and are breaking them down to see if they want to offer an e-bike. Anyway, here is what we learned over there this week.