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The Terrorism and Violent Extremism Awareness Guide raises awareness about terrorism and the issue of radicalization to violence. It is intended for first responders, parents, colleagues or friends of persons at-risk.

The guide helps readers better understand this concept, including: The guide contains many resources as well as information on how to ask for help when confronted by these behaviours. This material may not be reproduced in whole or in part in any form or by any means without the authorization of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police. We are aware that some of the images contained in the Terrorism and Violent Extremism Awareness Guide are protected by copyright.

The Royal Canadian Mounted Police has negotiated the conditions for their use with a number of international news agencies. These images are used only for prevention and education purposes and may not be reproduced by a third party under any circumstances. This guide contains textual information collected from a variety of open sources. This information was validated by Canadian academics and subject-matter specialists.

The Guide provides information on indicators and early warning signs of radicalization to violence, as well as information on how individuals can ask for assistance when confronted by behaviours associated to radicalization to violence. The Guide promotes the importance of education, awareness and dialogue for communities and front-line officers in efforts to disengage and prevent radicalization to violence. The CACP-CTNS committee hopes that the Terrorism and Violent Extremism Awareness Guide will assist law enforcement personnel and prevention practitioners to better understand native born american racist terrorist organization the phenomenon of radicalization to violence and how community-based prevention and protection initiatives are necessary.

We also hope it will enhance awareness and knowledge about terrorism and extremism in Canada. These freedoms are a fundamental right that our builders have shaped and developed for all Canadians. As a police organization, our role is to protect this right for the future.

The emergence of social media and our global communications environment remind us more than ever of the importance of being vigilant and aware of our surroundings. The virtual removal of geographical boundaries has facilitated the spread of radicalization to violence. What happens thousands of kilometres away is now much closer to us than it seems.

Some people are influenced by the propaganda in the social media and resolve to travel abroad to take part in terrorist activity. This issue, just like that of lone actors and extremists within our boundaries, is of great concern to all law enforcement agencies across the country.

Although we could fight endlessly against this threat using a law-enforcement approach, the long-term solution to mitigate unforeseeable threats lies in prevention and citizen engagement.

Better understanding for better prevention We live in a country where freedom of speech and freedom of thought are regarded as a valuable heritage that must be passed on to the next generations. Terrorism is an intricate question that represents the main threat to national security in Canada.

It is essential for everyone to better understand and recognize this phenomenon.

Terrorism and Violent Extremism Awareness Guide

This electronic book divided into sections is designed to help increase awareness and understanding of the various issues related to terrorism and violent extremism in Canada. This document is intended as a reference guide to this still emerging phenomenon in Canada. It contains a wealth of useful information from various sources to help you better understand radicalization leading to violence. Whether as a first responder or as a parent, colleague or friend of a person at risk, we all have a role to play in preventing radicalization to violence, in protecting our communities and in encouraging community-based prevention and protection initiatives.

Support and cooperation from the families of persons at risk is also invaluable, as relatives are often our only contact with them. Thanks to targeted support and prevention programs, we shall build together communities that are resistant to radicalization to violence. Constantly on the Internet, he was unfortunately manipulated and influenced at a time when he was vulnerable. His behaviour changed completely and he started seeing conspiracies everywhere.

I tried to find help for him, but he was too deeply radicalized. How I wish he was still with us and that none of this had ever happened. It addresses a number of related concepts, the role of the Internet and propaganda, and proposes actions to deal with this issue. Definitions Radicalization is the process by which individuals are introduced to an overtly ideological message and belief system that encourages movement from moderate, mainstream beliefs toward extreme views.

  • It contains a wealth of useful information from various sources to help you better understand radicalization leading to violence;
  • However, researchers and security services worldwide propose various models to better define specific trajectories;
  • Radicalization to violence is not a new phenomenon and is not limited to a single group, social class, religion, culture, ethnicity, age group or worldview;
  • Radical thinking is not a crime in itself;
  • Terrorism is an intricate question that represents the main threat to national security in Canada;
  • Vulnerable individuals searching for guidance and seeking a sense of belonging are more at risk of radicalization regardless of their background and level of education.

Radical thinking is not a crime in itself. Sympathizing with radical thinking does not necessarily lead to violence or terrorist action. However, radical thinking becomes a threat to national security when it leads an individual to espouse or engage in violence as a means of achieving political, ideological or religious goals.

  1. We are aware that some of the images contained in the Terrorism and Violent Extremism Awareness Guide are protected by copyright. It contains a wealth of useful information from various sources to help you better understand radicalization leading to violence.
  2. It takes into account relationships which are considered essential.
  3. A remarkable diversity Actual cases of extreme radicalization in Canada and elsewhere in the world Samantha Louise Lewthwaite. The CACP-CTNS committee hopes that the Terrorism and Violent Extremism Awareness Guide will assist law enforcement personnel and prevention practitioners to better understand the phenomenon of radicalization to violence and how community-based prevention and protection initiatives are necessary.
  4. Radicalization to violence is not a new phenomenon and is not limited to a single group, social class, religion, culture, ethnicity, age group or worldview.

Radicalization to violence is not a new phenomenon and is not limited to a single group, social class, religion, culture, ethnicity, age group or worldview.

Vulnerable individuals searching for guidance and seeking a sense of belonging are more at risk of radicalization regardless of their background and level of education. There is not one single profile.

International Association of Chiefs of Police. Models explaining radicalization The issue of radicalization to violence is complex and there is not one single typical profile of a terrorist.

Therefore, there is no simple explanation or consensus about a typical pathway to radicalization leading to violence. However, researchers and security services worldwide propose various models to better define specific trajectories.

The following are two of these models: Model focusing solely on the individual and proposing a step-by-step process, in the form of a staircase 2.

  1. The individual loses his job and makes it a personal issue.
  2. Vulnerable individuals searching for guidance and seeking a sense of belonging are more at risk of radicalization regardless of their background and level of education.
  3. The Guide promotes the importance of education, awareness and dialogue for communities and front-line officers in efforts to disengage and prevent radicalization to violence.
  4. We are aware that some of the images contained in the Terrorism and Violent Extremism Awareness Guide are protected by copyright.

Model referring to a feeling of injustice References to more models Crettiez, Xavier. This model focuses solely on the individual and proposes a step-by-step process, in the form of a staircase On the first floor, candidates for radicalization perceive injustices in their everyday life and think they can fight or correct them.

If they feel they have less and less non-violent options to achieve greater justice, they are likely to keep climbing. When this happens, they reach the second floor and displace their aggression onto out-groups. On the third floor, they gradually engage with the morality of the use of violence toward those they identify as the enemy. On the fourth floor, individuals join an organization they associate with and become indoctrinated.

Finally, it is when they reach the fifth and top floor that the radicalization process culminates and subjects mobilize and engage in terrorism and violent extremism. Image description Moghaddam Staircase Model: The individual feels that he is being fairly treated by society.

The individual loses his job and makes it a personal issue. The individual is still unemployed and begins to identify with far-right rhetoric. Still unemployed, the individual determines that using violence as an option is morally justified.

The unemployed individual joins a rightwing extremist group that promotes an anti-immigration ideology "Us against Them" rhetoric.

The unemployed individual engages in violent criminal acts against government institutions or targeted persons. Reference Moghaddam, Fathali M. The second model also refers to a feeling of injustice The individual may have a feeling of moral outrage; however, contrary to the first model, the second model considers that the personal process is not focused only on the individual.

It takes into account relationships which are considered essential. In fact, the receptivity of an individual to the process of radicalization to violence develops solely through acquaintances, friends and various social networks.

Image description The radicalization process according to Marc Sageman is represented as follows: Three intertwined circles specific interpretation of the world, feeling of moral outrage and resonance with personal experiences forming a whole the individual and surrounded by the individual's relationships entourage, friends, family, encounters and social networks. A remarkable diversity Actual cases of extreme radicalization in Canada and elsewhere in the world Samantha Louise Lewthwaite.