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The three reasons why hiking made me appreciate nature

  • I teach her about the nighttime sounds and the constellation of stars in the sky;
  • Now it comes down to perspective.

No masks, no motives, no hidden agendas. And on the very rare occasions that I thought that was the case, I realised later on that it was my own ego that was speaking. I may reach a remote desert water source that others had told me was viable, only to find it drier than a popcorn fart.

How I Taught My Daughter to Appreciate Nature

When you get right down to it, once I have made the decision to head out into the boonies, everything that happens after that is a byproduct of my original choice. To be more specific, I was riding out the mother of all storms in a dilapidated mining cabin at 4600 m 15,091 ft. I was stuck in that dank and dark shithole for a full day. The natural world is inherently fluid. Conditions can vary dramatically from day to day, let alone from one season to the next. Once you have made an objective assessment and accepted a situation for what it is — rather than what you thought it might or should be — theory must then be translated into action.

Decisions in the wilderness should be based upon two overriding considerations; 1. The conditions you are facing, and 2.

10 Reasons Why Adventure Travel Is Good for You

Do you have the ability, skill, equipment and experience with which to safely negotiate those conditions? Appreciate The decision is made; action has been taken. Now it comes down to perspective. Whether the challenge you are facing is simple or difficult in the extreme, nothing will ever be gained by moaning, blaming and second-guessing.

  1. To be more specific, I was riding out the mother of all storms in a dilapidated mining cabin at 4600 m 15,091 ft.
  2. Sarek National Park Route , Lapland, Sweden, 2009 During the last one and a half days of this trip, I spent 90 percent of the time hiking through driving wind, rain and thick fog. To be more specific, I was riding out the mother of all storms in a dilapidated mining cabin at 4600 m 15,091 ft.
  3. Whether it be in the wilderness or your everyday life, nothing builds strength and character like overcoming difficulties.
  4. Who would you be if you lived there?
  5. Upon reaching Canada, I took four days off to completely rest my knee, after which I began the penultimate hike of the 12 Long Walks, the Continental Divide Trail. The beauty and solitude of the snowbound landscapes was amazing, but just as important to me personally was the fact that I accepted, adapted and remained positive.

By choosing — and it is a choice — to view the tough moments as opportunities to learn rather than obstacles to endure, you give yourself the gift of appreciation. What are the times you have learnt the most from out in the wilderness?

The Three A’s

What is not a given is how you react to them. Whether it be in the wilderness or your everyday life, nothing builds strength and character like overcoming difficulties. End of Day 2 St. Sarek National Park RouteLapland, Sweden, 2009 During the last one and a half days of this trip, I spent 90 percent of the time hiking through driving wind, rain and thick fog.

Throughout this period I moved at a steady pace in order to minimize sweating, kept track of where I was at all times on the topo map, and always had my trusty Suunto M-2 compass at hand in order to make sure I was on the right bearing. Arthur Range Traverse Southwest Tasmania, 2015.

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Thanks to the Roaring Forties coming in off the Indian Ocean, this range regularly experiences some of the wildest storms on the planet. Hiking in this region is an exercise in patience, persistence and meteorological faith. Due to an unusually cool spring and an early season arrival time, I ended up hiking approximately 750 1207 km of the final 1000 miles 1609 km through Oregon and Washington in snowbound terrain.

This was the one period during the entire 14,432 mile 23,081 km journey that I was dealing with a potentially significant injury — a nagging case of patellar tendonitis in my left knee.

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Upon reaching Canada, I took four days off to completely rest my knee, after which I began the penultimate hike of the 12 Long Walks, the Continental Divide Trail. During the initial weeks of the CDT I continued to manage my daily mileage along with practicing the other measures described above. When combined with a much easier snow-free trail I started on August 3my knee slowly began to improve as I headed south through Montana. The beauty and solitude of the snowbound landscapes was amazing, but just as important to me personally was the fact that I accepted, adapted and remained positive.