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The modern intelligence and the new phenomena of the world war one

Other Subject Areas

The first is a rich and ancient field; the second is new, and smaller. The intersection between them is problematic.

  • Most of these works represent first-generation scholarship;
  • Some Miller, in press suggest that both height and intelligence are indicator of underlying genetic health, while others Kanazawa and Reyniers, 2007 contend that the extrinsic correlation stems from assortative mating of intelligent men and beautiful women, on the one hand, and that of tall men and beautiful women, on the other;
  • Surviving and fallen British soldiers during World War I Data In order to examine whether soldiers who survive wars are different in body size than soldiers who do not, I examine the service records of British soldiers in World War I;
  • Often, these works should be seen as case studies, which illustrate the experiences not just of one service or country, but many of both.

Much of the best military history takes intelligence for granted, while the strongest works about intelligence often do not address military topics. Discussions of military intelligence, moreover, touch on broader issues, like strategy, command, and communications. Works on military intelligence are not uniformly mature. Hence, narrow studies often are the best account available of important issues, even though they do not cover a whole topic. Articles and anthologies are more useful than in most areas of military history.

Rather than discuss weak studies about intelligence in important fields of military history, this bibliography aims to describe the best literature on military intelligence. Thus, it has special sections on areas where work on military intelligence is strong, and smaller sections on periods or topics where the study is weak, no matter how intrinsically important the latter may be.

Unfortunately, many important areas of military intelligence have received little attention, while a disproportionate number of good works focus on the Anglo-American experiences in the two world wars, which distorts understanding of the phenomenon as a whole. Sometimes, a good military history which pays respectable attention to intelligence is the best work available; or, alternatively, as with psychological warfare, a few old books offer a better picture than hundreds of more recent, but more narrow, articles.

Throughout the field, far more than with other areas of military history, one must take unusual care in avoiding bad books, which are legion.

Intelligence

This bibliography aims not merely to guide readers toward good books, but also away from bad ones; to note not just strengths, but also to suggest areas where more research is desirable, and possible.

Often, these works should be seen as case studies, which illustrate the experiences not just of one service or country, but many of both. Most of these works represent first-generation scholarship. There are as yet few cases of second-generation historiography, replete with revisionism and debate.

  • Some offer proximate explanations of the returning soldier effect;
  • Height distributions of surviving soldiers top panel and fallen soldiers bottom panel , British troops during the World War I The solid vertical line indicates the mean height of surviving soldiers 168;
  • The intelligence operations of the Soviet Union were likely of even greater dimensions prior to the dissolution of the country in 1991;
  • Queen Elizabeth I reigned 1558—1603 of England maintained a notable intelligence organization.

Such cases will be noted. This guide also focuses on works written in the English language.

The puzzle: the ‘returning soldier effect’

Bibliographies The literature on the history of intelligence in general, and military intelligence in particular, is scattered across dozens of specialist subfields, in many languages.

Fortunately, one strength of the field is works of bibliography, which guide the assiduous student toward works of relevance. Constantinides 1983 retains value, but is somewhat dated. Sexton 1996 and Shulman 1976 offer good if dated bibliographies on one key area, signals intelligence. West 2010 points to works on naval intelligence, while Whaley 2007 is a masterful compilation of works on deception.

Polmar and Allen 2004 is a useful encyclopedia, for general reference.

  • Its emphasis on these sources of intelligence, however, may actually have weakened its ability to combat terrorist organizations, which by their nature are not easily penetrated through technical means;
  • Bibliographies The literature on the history of intelligence in general, and military intelligence in particular, is scattered across dozens of specialist subfields, in many languages;
  • Indeed, a lack of adequate human intelligence was cited by some critics as a factor in the failure of U;
  • Some Miller, in press suggest that both height and intelligence are indicator of underlying genetic health, while others Kanazawa and Reyniers, 2007 contend that the extrinsic correlation stems from assortative mating of intelligent men and beautiful women, on the one hand, and that of tall men and beautiful women, on the other.

Intelligence, Espionage and Related Topics: