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The social acceptance and staying true to ones beliefs in antigone

Themes commented on by the presentation were women, religion and tragedy; further examining their place in society at the time the play was written by contrasting it to society today.

Obstacles hindering my understanding of the play, including its time and setting, have been removed. After comparing so vividly the society of Ancient Greece and that of the one I live in, I can now empathize with Antigone and the rest of the characters in the play, consequently broadening my understanding of the hard times that they had to endure.

The contemporary issues that shaped the play deserve further exploration. Before the presentation, I was aware of some differences between their society and ours but I was unaware that they were so extreme.

  1. The Chorus sings sadly of the fate that dogs the whole house of Labdacus, the ancestor of Oedipus. Obstacles hindering my understanding of the play, including its time and setting, have been removed.
  2. Although she says differently, it appears that Antigone also strives for public acclaim in Thebes. As the play begins, Antigone vows to bury her brother Polynices ' body in defiance of Creon 's edict, although her sister Ismene refuses to help her, fearing the death penalty.
  3. As the two are directly opposed, it is interesting to see how the characters cope in the same culture. Creon decides to spare Ismene but rules that Antigone should be buried alive in a cave as punishment for her transgressions.
  4. Gellie — Melbourne University Press 1972 Author. His motivations are driven by his selfishness and not by the opinions or interest of his people.

How fast would you like to get it? We'll occasionally send you account related and promo emails. Although she seems extremely negative and erratic, Ismene was shown to be a leading example of a woman at the time — the first difference between their society and ours. Another important theme that was brought to my attention during the interactive oral presentation was that of religion. The religious laws in this time and country were incredibly significant.

It would have affected how the people in the country the characters in the play acted and what they thought, a large contrast to today. The themes examined by Antigone would have been incredibly shocking to the original audience as they were the social norms. After being informed, I was then able to make connections in the text, as to why certain things were said and insinuated about being rewarded in the afterlife and why specific acts were committed — all under the influence of religion.

Prior to the presentation, I was completely uninformed as to the religion and many other cultural aspects of Ancient Greece. By pitching these two individuals against each other, Sophocles also successfully reveals the raw and multi-faceted nature of humanity.

By studying the destiny of each character, and how each of their fates come to pass, one can get a clearer understanding of how and why Sophocles influences the audience into favoring Antigone and her domestic role, rather than Creon and his cold inflexibility. Antigone is placed as both lead character and heroine of the play, as she holds a domestic, reasoned and more acceptable stance; any audience would name her as heroine.

Antigone does this without question, so deep is her respect of the gods over the state. She clearly feels more obligated towards her religious responsibilities and ties than anything else. This somewhat defiant character believes that the gods alone determine her fate; she will do whatever is necessary to appease them. I shall die in the knowledge that I have acted justly. What greater satisfaction than that … We have too little time to waste it on men, and the laws they make. The approval of the dead is everlasting, and I shall bask in it as I lie among them.

Antigone: Top Ten Quotes

This strong and deeply held belief drives Antigone to stand by her familial responsibilities with steely determination and to perform the burial rights or her deceased brother that were callously denied him by Creon. Her acceptance of death shocks the audience as it almost seems as if she desires it.

She remains certain throughout the play that the gods will reward her devotion and her heroic actions in the afterlife. Although she says differently, it appears that Antigone also strives for public acclaim in Thebes. You must tell everybody, shout it in the streets.

This rebellious response from Antigone seems to indicate that her actions are not only divinely, but also somewhat egotistically motivated. Rather than fearing the immortal gods and their unwritten laws, Creon strives to uphold those of man and of state. His stubborn punishment of Antigone, a woman whose only desire is to bury her brother, shows a lack of respect and contempt for all family values and ties.

Although Creon could justify his actions as being those required of a king, it is evident that they are too extreme. However, this is somewhat redressed later when, ironically he loses his family members: Throughout Antigone, Creon appears to be unable to grasp the key traits of ruling and living in an ethical society. The heart of one who weaves wickedness in darkness is usually convicted beforehand.

I, for my part, hate anyone caught in the act who tries to beautify his crimes thereupon. One can feel nothing but disdain for such a harsh and unfeeling character. This is evident when he introduces his new decree, stating that Polynices cannot be buried. His motivations are driven by his selfishness and not by the opinions or interest of his people. Egotistical traits such as these are neither honorable nor wise for a successful ruler.

The viewpoints of each character can be interpreted as quite ironic and at odds: Likewise, even though Creon remains a loving husband and father, his ability to completely disregard familial ties in support of state laws is shocking. As the two are directly opposed, it is interesting to see how the characters cope in the same culture. Antigone and Creon are of such determined characters, that the irony considering each of their particular devotions to family and state becomes even more alarming.

Antigone appears the most ethical of the two as she is willing to risk her life over her decision to uphold family rights; Creon can also appear morally just, because, as king, he is motivated solely by his duty to serve Thebes.

  1. Tiresias warns that all of Greece will despise him, and that the sacrificial offerings of Thebes will not be accepted by the gods, but Creon merely dismisses him as a corrupt old fool. The Chorus sings an ode of victory after the battle between the brothers Polyneices and Eteocles for the throne of Thebes.
  2. After comparing so vividly the society of Ancient Greece and that of the one I live in, I can now empathize with Antigone and the rest of the characters in the play, consequently broadening my understanding of the hard times that they had to endure. There was hope for the fair Antigone, but now she follows the family fate.
  3. We'll occasionally send you account related and promo emails. The Chorus addresses the devastated Creon, who is alone after all his family has died through his mistake.

The social acceptance and staying true to ones beliefs in antigone could also be argued that neither Creon nor Antigone are wrong in their convictions: As the two protagonists stubbornly remain true to their deeply held beliefs and responsibilities, they are driven to make decisions that ultimately lead to their mutual destruction. As well as highlighting the problems with society at that time, Sophocles through the characters of Antigone and Creon, reveals the true face of humanity, in all its ugliness.

Sophocles successfully plays with our emotions and makes us feel outraged. Like her king, Antigone demonstrates strong opinions and, at times, acts in her own interest. These obstinate principles are what lead Antigone down the path of destruction, glorified nonetheless. Consequently, the audience is encouraged to feel less sympathy for Creon than they do for Antigone, a woman whose only desire is to bury her slain brother. Antigone is prepared to lose her life trying to uphold family values and feels she has no choice but to accept her fate.

On the other hand, after pleas from numerous characters, Creon repeatedly fails to see sense and strives to avoid his dark fate. To conclude, in the play Antigone, the catastrophic conflict of beliefs that occurred between family and state in ancient Thebes is carefully demonstrated in the disastrous events that take place. Questions of morality and duty are challenged throughout the play as the two central characters, Antigone and Creon, clash violently in their battle to uphold the views they so diligently and resolutely stand behind.

The views and deeply held beliefs of Antigone and Creon are of key significance in the play; they are what drive the plot to its tragic conclusion. Need Help With Your Essay? Get Help From Professional Writer However, they are not simply the driving force of the play, but the vehicle through which Sophocles exposes the many facets of humanity: Clarendon Press 1896 2.

Sophocles — Antigone 3. A Reading — G. Gellie — Melbourne University Press 1972 Author: