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Elements of romanticism in to autumn by john keats

The blog intends to discuss the various facets of the Romantic Revival reflected in art and literature of Europe. Close bosom-friend of the maturing sun; Conspiring with him how to load and bless With fruit the vines that round the thatch-eaves run; To bend with apples the mossed cottage-trees, And fill all fruit with ripeness to the core; To swell the gourd, and plump the hazel shells With a sweet kernel; to set budding more, And still more, later flowers for the bees, Until they think warm days will never cease, For Summer has o'erbrimmed their clammy cells.

Who hath not seen thee oft amid thy store?

How is Keats' Romanticism Revealed in the Poems 'To Autumn' and 'La Belle Dame Sans Merci'?

Sometimes whoever seeks abroad may find Thee sitting careless on a granary floor, Thy hair soft-lifted by the winnowing wind; Or on a half-reaped furrow sound asleep, Drowsed with the fume of poppies, while thy hook Spares the next swath and all its twined flowers; And sometimes like a gleaner thou dost keep Steady thy laden head across a brook; Or by a cider-press, with patient look, Thou watchest the last oozings, hours by hours.

Where are the songs of Spring? Ay, where are they? Think not of them, thou hast thy music too, - While barred clouds bloom the soft-dying day And touch the stubble-plains with rosy hue; Then in a wailful choir the small gnats mourn Among the river sallows, borne aloft Or sinking as the light wind lives or dies; And full-grown lambs loud bleat from hilly bourn; Hedge-crickets sing, and now with treble soft The redbreast whistles from a garden-croft; And gathering swallows twitter in the skies.

This, the last of Keats' odes was published in 1820.

  • Everything is simple, direct and clear, and the poem is pervaded throughout by a mood of serene tranquility;
  • The second stanza gives an authentic image of autumn through living personifications like those of a reaper, a gleaner and a wine-grower;
  • Close bosom-friend of the maturing sun; Conspiring with him how to load and bless With fruit the vines that round the thatch-eaves run; To bend with apples the mossed cottage-trees, And fill all fruit with ripeness to the core; To swell the gourd, and plump the hazel shells With a sweet kernel; to set budding more, And still more, later flowers for the bees, Until they think warm days will never cease, For Summer has o'erbrimmed their clammy cells.

The poem shows Keats in a rich mood of serenity. Autumn is not regarded here as the prelude to winter, but it is a season of mellow fruitfulness - a season of ripeness and fulfilment.

The Ode gives a graphic description of the season of autumn with all its richness.

  • Think not of them, thou hast thy music too, - While barred clouds bloom the soft-dying day And touch the stubble-plains with rosy hue; Then in a wailful choir the small gnats mourn Among the river sallows, borne aloft Or sinking as the light wind lives or dies; And full-grown lambs loud bleat from hilly bourn; Hedge-crickets sing, and now with treble soft The redbreast whistles from a garden-croft; And gathering swallows twitter in the skies;
  • The third stanza describes the music of autumn, the plaintive singing of the gnats, the bleating of lambs, the chirp of the crickets and the soft tremble of the red breast;
  • The Ode gives a graphic description of the season of autumn with all its richness;
  • It will talk about the importance of nature, or the;;;
  • Sometimes whoever seeks abroad may find Thee sitting careless on a granary floor, A reader can't help but feel relaxed and calm as they read the poem;
  • Everything is simple, direct and clear, and the poem is pervaded throughout by a mood of serene tranquility.

The first stanza describes its gifts of ripe fruits and new crops of flowers. The second stanza gives an authentic image of autumn through living personifications like those of a reaper, a gleaner and a wine-grower. The third stanza describes the music of autumn, the plaintive singing of the gnats, the bleating of lambs, the chirp of the crickets and the soft tremble of the red breast.

In the 'Ode to Autumn', Keats wrote a poem which shows Greek spirit and Greek way of writing more than any other poem in the English language.

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It is classical in the true sense of the word. There is to be found here, no romantic strangeness or mystery, no emotional agitation. Everything is simple, direct and clear, and the poem is pervaded throughout by a mood of serene tranquility.

  • In the 'Ode to Autumn', Keats wrote a poem which shows Greek spirit and Greek way of writing more than any other poem in the English language;
  • The third stanza describes the music of autumn, the plaintive singing of the gnats, the bleating of lambs, the chirp of the crickets and the soft tremble of the red breast;
  • Its focus is on the beauty of nature and the peace that it brings people.

The 'Ode to Nightingale' and 'Ode on a Grecian Urn' may have a greater appeal by reason of their pathos and glow of emotion, but the 'Ode to Autumn' is unique in its rounded perfection and felicity of loveliness. Swinburne speaks of this ode as 'perhaps the nearest to absolute perfection.