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The role of censorship on the internet

The second phase will be held in Tunis, 16-18 November 2005. OpenNet Initiative "The OpenNet Initiative is a collaborative partnership between three leading academic institutions: Our aim is to excavate, expose and analyze filtering and surveillance practices in a credible and non-partisan fashion. We intend to uncover the potential pitfalls and unintended consequences of these practices, and thus help to inform better public policy and advocacy work in this area. To achieve these aims, the ONI employs a unique multi-disciplinary approach that includes: Advanced Technical Means—using a suite of sophisticated network interrogation tools and metrics; and Local Knowledge Expertise—through a global network of regionally based researchers and experts.

Control and Censorship of the Internet

OpenNet Initiative research will be published on this website in a series of national and regional case studies, occasional papers, and bulletins. As part of its work, the OpenNet Initiative also operates a "clearinghouse" for circumvention technologies that assess and evaluate systems intended to let users bypass filtering and surveillance.

We also actively develop circumvention technologies in-house as a means to explore the limitations of filtration and counter-filtration practices.

The second phase will take place in Tunis hosted by the Government of Tunisia, from 16 to 18 November 2005.

  • In my opinion, although I concede that censorship is not fully justified, it is beneficial to some extent;
  • In Vietnam and Tunisia, big shots official or otherwise are distinctly unenthusiastic about this vast discussion forum and information exchange they have so much trouble controlling;
  • In the Singapore context, the Media Development Authority prohibits the use of any words which contain insensitive comments about any races on the Internet.

Encouraging the development of knowledge societies requires overcoming these gaps, "consolidating two pillars of the global information society that are still too unevenly guaranteed—access to information for all and freedom of expression. The next World Report, scheduled for 2007, will examine cultural diversity. This initiative is intended to lend a truly global dimension to the multitude of efforts to bridge the global digital divide, foster digital opportunity and thus firmly put ICT at the service of development for all.

Or else they disturb and worry them.

Control and Censorship of the Internet

Some people distrust them. Others see them as the vanguard of a new information revolution. It provides best practice case studies and showcases a variety of campaign tools, including investigative missions, coalition-building, legal advocacy and Internet-based actions, such as blogging, e-mail protest letters and SMS text messaging.

It also gives activists important tools for mounting campaign strategies and doing power analyses of their local situations.

  1. As such, rising dissent is observed among Chinese netizens as they are denied of the fair chances to view and express their views as compared to other netizens around the world.
  2. Content such as violence, gambling and pornography should be censored for children below the age of 18 as to prevent them from being overly exposed to content like this when they are still growing and going through the stage of psychological instability, where over-exposure to violence and sexual content would lead to an increase in juvenile delinquency. But the regime is still banning users from looking at websites it considers endanger "the social order and the socialist system.
  3. Our aim is to excavate, expose and analyze filtering and surveillance practices in a credible and non-partisan fashion. In a way, censorship impedes the learning process of human and stifles the imaginative mind.
  4. OpenNet Initiative "The OpenNet Initiative is a collaborative partnership between three leading academic institutions.

Dozens of Internet users languish in Chinese prisons for imaginary crimes—for looking at banned websites or, even "worse," daring to post news online about forbidden topics such as the 1989 Tiananmen Square massacre and repression in Tibet. China is unfortunately not the only country where dissident Internet messages are tracked down. In Vietnam and Tunisia, big shots official or otherwise are distinctly unenthusiastic about this vast discussion forum and information exchange they have so much trouble controlling.

But the regime is still banning users from looking at websites it considers endanger "the social order and the socialist system. The End of the Internet?