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An overview of the anzac legend and the source of the australian fight and bravery

What happened at Gallipoli made them an important part of Australian culture at a time when the newly-federated nation of Australia had not yet established herself at an international level.

  1. On the Australian home-front during the war the name and face of Albert Jacka were instantly recognisable but that recognition has long faded. On the night of 28-29 August, a party of Light horsemen commanded by Throssell held off a determined Turkish counter-attack on a captured trench during which hundreds of bombs where thrown by both sides.
  2. Postwar immigration is yet to broaden the cultural identity of the population. The words of 'What Do You Think...
  3. The stereotype developed that the Anzac rejected unnecessary restrictions, possessed a sardonic sense of humour, was contemptuous of danger, and proved himself the equal of anyone on the battlefield.
  4. But they had a silent pride that put these things into proper perspective.
  5. The Aboriginal population is conveniently absent.

What is the legend? In theory, the legend is that the Australian and New Zealand troops helped to establish their countries' reputations in the world through qualities of strength and bravery when faced with adversity.

In fact, it is much more than that. The legend of these men who endured so much has given something of which Australians can be proud.

  • Some later felt bitter about this lack of appreciation of many similar acts of bravery shown by the New Zealanders at Chunuk Bair and other actions at Anzac;
  • Men like Shout were often the most ready to concede that the bravery and sacrifice of thousands of other soldiers went unrecorded and remained unknown except to their comrades in arms;
  • For the Australians and New Zealanders much terrible fighting, marked by close range bombing and hand to hand action similar to what had occurred at Lone Pine, took place at Hill 60 between 21 and 29 August 1915;
  • Gallipoli was the first opportunity for Australia to earn the respect of other nations and to show the world her strong national character.

It put Australia's mark on the world as something other than a nation descended from convicts. How was it created? It is not uncommon for the characteristics of soldiers to mirror the characteristics commonly found in the society from which they come. This has resulted in the emergence of a number of stereotypes for soldiers from each nation.

The Anzac Portal

The Australian soldiers, who had not had a chance to prove themselves on an international front prior to Gallipoli, found that their strong characteristics were revealed in the most challenging of times. It was through events such as the landing at Anzac Cove and the battle at The Nek where ANZACs were slaughtered in their massesthat they acquired the image that has become synonymous with the word 'digger.

  • From a range of sources he provided evidence of the soldiers' bad behaviour;
  • In 2008 an editorial in the Sydney Morning Herald stated;
  • While traits such as egalitarianism, resourcefulness and initiative are assumed and maintained in the nation's popular memory as a truthful representation, not only of Australia's First World War soldiers, but also, of the national character, they were not sufficiently evident in the experience of the 1st Battalion [at Gallipoli] to justify their advancement as characteristics general to Australian soldiers or the nation;
  • In the eyes of the rest of the world, Australia had no eminent military history and no distinct cultural characteristics as a nation;
  • Some later felt bitter about this lack of appreciation of many similar acts of bravery shown by the New Zealanders at Chunuk Bair and other actions at Anzac.

More importantly, it suggests a soldier with certain moral qualities, such as a good sense of humour and an overriding belief in mateship and equality. These qualities set them apart from soldiers from other nations and were said to be attributable to their rural backgrounds in the bush.

Introduction

Many of the World War I diggers were third generation Australians from the early days of pioneering. Their particular attributes included: It is precisely this type of person and this type of soldier who gave the ANZACs their reputation which, in turn, instilled a new national pride in Australia and New Zealand.

The Anzac legend

See image 2 Why is it important? The Gallipoli Campaign was a particularly significant event in history because it came at a time when Australia had only just become a federal commonwealth, trying to assert her place alongside a collection of nations with thousands of years of history. In the eyes of the rest of the world, Australia had no eminent military history and no distinct cultural characteristics as a nation.

Gallipoli was the first opportunity for Australia to earn the respect of other nations and to show the world her strong national character. See video The Anzac legend is also important because it encourages Australians to remember the soldiers who sacrificed their lives for their country.

  • When it was all over the dead lay thickly all around the position and the war diary of the 2nd Battalion AIF recorded that during the cleaning up process bodies were found in such a state of decomposition that men could only do the work by wearing gas masks;
  • What happened at Gallipoli made them an important part of Australian culture at a time when the newly-federated nation of Australia had not yet established herself at an international level;
  • Postwar immigration is yet to broaden the cultural identity of the population;
  • The words of 'What Do You Think;;;
  • Bassett, indeed, was quite surprised by his award and said later in life;
  • Throssell had written of himself 'I have never recovered from my 1914-1918 experiences'.

The legend has made such an impression on Australians that we continue to commemorate the landing of the ANZAC soldiers on the shores of Gallipoli on 25 April each year.