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A recommendation of the book road to chilifa to immigrant teenagers in canada

  • Of Solitudes and Borders;
  • Enraged, Karim tries to help her and, in the ensuing fight, one of the boys stabs Karim;
  • The Road to Chlifa and Pieces of Me found their way into English translations in spite of potentially different sensibilities and challenges;
  • Between my thighs a sensation of warmth and wetness.

We examine the representation of adolescent bodies in space and movement, and how these coming of age narratives play out in relation to discourses about nationality and citizenship. We argue that we need to understand and continue to explicate the complex set of cultural readings and re- readings engendered by these and other coming of age novels that cross real and imagined boundaries of federation and language; that is, we encourage educators to examine representations of adolescent protagonists in relation to the production and reception of literary works that travel within and across our borders.

Theresa Rogers is a Professor in the Department of Language and Literacy Education at the University of British Columbia, Canada, where she teaches courses in literature teaching, content literacies, and young adult literature. Specifically, we examine the representation of adolescent bodies in space and movement, and how these coming of age narratives play out in relation to normative cultural discourses about belonging and nationhood.

  • The invention of the teenager 46c the invention of the teenager the automobile was monumental in the evolution of teenagers were given privacy, and a sexual revolution swept america experimentation with sexual behaviors before marriage became increasingly common;
  • From the first page, the readers are situated by the mention of date and place where the story takes place;
  • From Paule, Mira hears that her life belongs to her, and she comes to accept that she cannot change her parents;
  • I wish the birdman i.

One example of the Canadian national imaginary is the commonly-held belief among many Canadians that Canada is a nation that embraces multiculturalism especially in contrast to the American assimilationist perspectives represented in English only language policies and others policies aimed at immigrants.

This perspective is inscribed in official documents, such as the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedom and the home page of Citizenship and Immigration Canada, which states: In fact, some scholars link the idea of multiculturalism in North America to the 1965 preliminary report of the Canadian Royal Commission of Bilingualism and Biculturalism Zeytinoglu, 2010 meant to support Francophone minority citizens.

The Canadian imaginary of inclusiveness, however, is often more an ideology than a practice. Many historical atrocities played out in the lives of First Nations citizens and immigrant groups who were subjected to internment, taxation and other injustices.

Currently, the expression is used in both languages and largely refers to a lack of communication or to misunderstandings between the two groups. Connais pas… 1998 by Charlotte Gingras—found their way into English translations. These two young adult novels depict aspects of this solitude through their representations of the relationality of body and space, and the complex relationship of this relationality to belonging.

We illustrate that, while these two novels portray complex and diverse adolescent subjectivities, they are often received in ways that attempt to gloss over cultural specificity and complexity in favour of more universalized cultural ideologies in educational discourse.

Of that number, twelve were novels for young adults,3 i. There has been some speculation on the cultural and linguistic challenges in translating Canadian novels for young adults from French to English.

With Pieces of me, Ouriou accomplished this feat in 2009. Susan Ouriou translated these novels: Furthermore Poulin 2002 suggests that the subjects and themes often differ from subjects and themes of English-Canadian books for children and adolescents. She suggests that, in young adult literature, sexuality is one such subject; we would like to suggest that displacement is another.

This risk-taking approach, suggests Cobban 2006might be one of the barriers to translation of Canadian novels for young adults from French to English, and to reaching a Canadian English-speaking readership. The Road to Chlifa and Pieces of Me found their way into English translations in spite of potentially different sensibilities and challenges. In analysing these two novels we first focus on the two protagonists as representations of adolescent bodies in space and movement in relation to the translation process.

It could be argued that these two protagonists reproduce aspects of normative gender representations in which the male protagonist appears to be more heroic and physically mobile and the female protagonist is involved in a more internalized struggle and is more confined in place.

The two protagonists, however, also work against stereotype in terms of raced and sexed bodies in relation to subjective mobility and sense of belonging. We then comment on how these novels are interpreted in the context of normative cultural discourses represented in literary and educational reviews. We conclude with suggestions for reading these novels in relation to the cultural discourses of nationhood and belonging and the production and reception of literary works that travel within and across our borders.

In The Road to Chlifa, a sense of place is evoked by the inclusion of a number of small details. From the first page, the readers are situated by the mention of date and place where the story takes place. Karim, the protagonist, is from Beirut, Lebanon.

In his diary, Karim makes his opinion of his new high school clear: And especially the people — teachers and students combined.

  1. Which country do you prefer for living, england or humid and oppressive the uk is more expensive for train travel and going out clothing and books are much and her family, and have travelled around adelaide and adelaide hills, sydney and the blue mountains and the coast road to. Je pose mes mains sur mes seins.
  2. The mention of many street names, and geographical elements e.
  3. The Road To Chlifa.

Je ne veux rien de lui ni des autres. Less than a month after he begins school, Karim accompanies his classmates on a three-day trip. One night, a group of boys attempts to rape My-Lan, a Vietnamese refugee and also an alien body.

Enraged, Karim tries to help her and, in the ensuing fight, one of the boys stabs Karim. Part II takes us a few months back in time and to a different place—Lebanon. Offsetting the sense of displacement in Part I are the descriptions of Beirut and Lebanon.

Focalized through a narrator, the reader follows Karim as he falls in love with Nada, and bravely goes out into a Beirut made unsafe by bombing to visit her at every occasion. They invite Karim to join them, but he declines, wanting to be near Nada. Karim has been sitting still in a Beirut he knows well, and from which he has refused to move.

Maha convinces Karim to accompany her and Jad, her six-month old brother, on an eighty-kilometre trip, from Beirut to Chlifa, though the country is torn by civil war. When he accepts the fact he must leave Beirut, Karim finds himself moving across spaces, in the context of war-torn Lebanon, that he would have never otherwise explored.

The mention of many street names, and geographical elements e. Even if the two teenagers barely know anywhere else in Lebanon than Beirut, they have no fear once in the countryside. Maha and Karim do not experience a sense of displacement: After their worst fight, Karim is restless, and he decides to go for a short hike on his own. While he is gone, Maha is raped and killed.

Karim is devastated, but Maha acts again as a driving narrative force: However, the perversion of sexual violence and his own violent response propels him toward a deeper understanding of his own physical and subjective journey.

In the last section of the novel, the narrative is again doubly focalized. Karim writes about his recovery, while the unnamed female character explains how the class settles into some kind of a routine. In The Road to Chlifa, Karim moves between geographical contexts and spaces, and the novel is focalized in complex ways. Ultimately, two very different spaces within the novel are tentatively reconciled in a safe space of privacy Nodelman, 2004.

The Road to Chlifa

I believe that questions of exile, being uprooted, war, racism, openness to others, etc. In 2009, it was translated into English by Susan Ouriou, and published as Pieces of me.

  • Even if the two teenagers barely know anywhere else in Lebanon than Beirut, they have no fear once in the countryside;
  • The Globe and Mail, p;
  • In The Road to Chlifa, a sense of place is evoked by the inclusion of a number of small details.

A confining sense of place is conveyed from the first page when Mira, sitting alone in the school cafeteria, ruminates on a young maple tree outside the window: A series of spare first-person vignettes convey how Mira feels about her developing body, her sadness, and her hesitation to follow her passion and talent for drawing. Offsetting the more cloistered spaces are allusions to birds in flight. Taking her hated walks with her mother, Mira escapes: Je me perds dans les fentes du trottoir.

For the first time in her life, Mira has someone to chat with and someone to confide in. One night, as she lies awake, Mira is thinking of Catherine: However, when Mira permanently loses her father to a tragic plane accident in the northern wilderness, she directs her anger at Brenda, the stuffed buzzard her father had once given her, and tears its wings. Birds as well as the wilderness and its imagined freedom have become, for her, new spaces to fear.

  1. Reproductive rights are legal rights and freedoms relating to reproduction and reproductive health that vary amongst countries around the world the world health. With Pieces of me, Ouriou accomplished this feat in 2009.
  2. Specifically, these two novels could be viewed as examples of what has been described as a lingering solitude in relation to young adult literature in Canada.
  3. One night, a group of boys attempts to rape My-Lan, a Vietnamese refugee and also an alien body.
  4. Young Adult Books—Getting to the Roots. Information and facts about immunization, including travel and influenza vaccines and canada's vaccine safety network immunization and vaccines.

Two adults in the novel guide Mira through her trauma. One is an art teacher upon whom Mira displaces her affections. He also sees her vulnerability, and how fragile she is after the death of her father.

In a moment of weakness, he also shows he is attracted to her, but does not act upon it. Mirabelle sees this as a rejection, rather than as the action of an adult who is conscious of how inappropriate it would be to act on his feelings.

Paule becomes the other adult who guides Mira through her trauma, providing support and solace. From Paule, Mira hears that her life belongs to her, and she comes to accept that she cannot change her parents. Gingras herself describes it: Email, 17 March 2010 a fragile heroine who is trying to free herself from a possessive mother, who is on the brink of madness.

Je pose mes mains sur mes seins. Dans le miroir, mes yeux me fixent, humides, avec des lueurs. I bring my hand to my breasts.

A recommendation of the book road to chilifa to immigrant teenagers in canada

I wish the birdman i. In the mirror, my eyes stare at me, wet and shining. Between my thighs a sensation of warmth and wetness. I slide a hand over my stomach and down there, too. In the mirror, my mouth opens of it own accord.

My legs start to quiver. What is striking is the movement away from a confined, claustrophobic, and suffocating sense of place: The novel ends with Mira deciding to take responsibility for her own sense of freedom. After a night alone, where she sees in a dream all the human beings she knows gathered in the middle of the lake, she hears a voice: Il faut rentrer, Mira, allez, rentrons. Tu ne veux pas marcher vers le nord. Tu ne veux pas mourir. Following this dream, the adolescent begins to value her filiations and affiliations in new ways.

Said 1983 defines filiation as biological or familial ties, as the bonds between generations. Affiliation, on the other hand, refers to bonds created outside of the biological family, and are founded on cultural connections Said, 1983.

Toward the end of the novel Mira chooses not to break away from her filial relations, but she also decides not to let filiations rule her life, and to invest in relations of affiliation. She asks her mother to allow her to attend a one-month art summer class, and she forgives Catherine and her art teacher. The translation of Pieces of Me has been lauded for being seamlessly lyrical. Susan Ouriou has created a magical rendering of the exquisite original.

A reviewer for CM Magazine wrote that the novel: Young readers of the English translation echo this review. You just get little snatches of the story until it builds up into a complete view of the characters, and the language was just absolutely beautiful, which is surprising as it is translated from French. By means of her body awakening to sexuality, Mira moves into a new space, into young adulthood.