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The misconceptions of the views on diversity as a racial issue

Learn how to help reduce discrimination and racism. What is racial prejudice and racism? Why is it important to reduce racial prejudice and racism? How can you reduce racial prejudice and racism?

  1. This attempt could result in change at the individual level.
  2. It helps to change people's racial stereotypes and attitudes, but the only way real change can come about is if our institutions and systems implement policies that promote racial equality. Critical thinking helps students realize that just as "prejudice against" certain people or groups is problematic, "prejudice for" certain groups also creates problems.
  3. Multicultural education is an accepted part of the curriculum. Topics of discussion have included how faith communities are hoping to combat racial prejudice, and also how religion can make existing racial and ethnic divisions worse.

You're at a restaurant with a group of co-workers after work. You're telling them about your decision to buy a house in Western Heights and how excited you are.

One of them says to you, "Are you sure want to move there? I hear that there is a lot of crime in that area, you know, robberies, drugs, and even murder. It's a Black neighborhood, you know, that's probably why. Did you consider Eastern Heights?

  • While race is not biology, racism can certainly affect our biology, especially our health;
  • Put another way, students must learn to recognize when their natural tendency to prejudge stands in the way of their ability to empathize with someone from another race, religion, or with someone who has a particular disability;
  • The meeting should be facilitated by someone who has experience with conflict management and is deemed credible by both John and Cha;
  • Every participant in your effort has his or her own understanding of the world and how it works;
  • Teaching with a multicultural perspective:

You may fit in there better! It's a nice middle-class, White suburban neighborhood. Definitely no crime there, if you know what I mean. You can't believe that someone is actually saying this. You start to tell her that she's wrong and ask her what made her think that way. You think some more about what happened on your way home.

You realize that your colleague is but one person; who knows how many other people out there think like her? It helps to change people's racial stereotypes and attitudes, but the only way real change can come about is if our institutions and systems implement policies that promote racial equality. You suddenly feel angry. What if redlining still goes on because real estate companies are filled with people who think like your colleague?

  • Consider what existing resources you can build on and what additional assistance or resources you may need e;
  • The book does have a delightful repetitive pattern that many children enjoy;
  • Do you regard the non-veteran as coddled and lazy?

What policies exist to stop such institutionalized prejudice? The above encounter at the restaurant is an example of racial prejudice. Redlining refusing to sell a property to someone based on his or her racewhich is illegal, is an act of racism or institutionalized prejudice.

It is important to understand the distinction between racial prejudice and racism because they are affected differently by issues related to power and, therefore, require different levels of involvement and effort to address. There are many forms of prejudice and oppression, not just based on race, but on gender, class, sexual orientation, etc.

This section does not attempt to deal with all the possible forms. The strategies and activities described here for addressing racial prejudice and racism can, however, provide ideas for dealing with other forms of discrimination. As you work on addressing such inequities, think also about ways to prevent them by encouraging and establishing inclusive practices right from the start.

Diversity vs. Inclusion: Misconceptions and Things You Can Do

Imagine that this work resembles two sides of a coin. One side represents the negative values and practices you are against. The other side represents the positive values and practices you are for. In other words, start thinking about building inclusive communities while fighting the "isms" that exist in our society.

What is racial prejudice? To be racially prejudiced means to have an unfavorable or discriminatory attitude or belief towards someone else or another group of people primarily on the basis of skin color or ethnicity.

For example, John is prejudiced because he believes that the new Hmong refugees in his community are stupid and barbaric because they kill chickens in their backyard.

He has reported this to the local police many times. What do you think should be done in this situation? One possibility is to invite John and Cha his Hmong neighbor to a meeting to help John understand the Hmong culture and to help Cha understand the state laws and regulations about killing animals in your home. The meeting should be facilitated by someone who has experience with conflict management and is deemed credible by both John and Cha.

This attempt could result in change at the individual level. When racial prejudice is supported by institutions and laws, racism is present. For example, when the Hmong neighbor, Cha, is arrested and put in jail for killing chickens in the backyard and no attempt is made to understand why he did it or to explain the laws to him because he does not speak Englishracism is present. One possibility is to invite the police chief and other officers to a discussion about how the newcomers to the community are affecting law enforcement.

It is likely that they have tried to explain the laws to the newcomers so that these complaints can stop, but it's not working because of cultural and language barriers.

You might want to try and work with the police and local Hmong leaders to develop a strategy for increasing the police department's cultural competence and, at the same time, increase the newcomers' understanding about the laws in this country.

This attempt could result in change at the institutional level. While we can never be entirely free of racial prejudice, we have to be able to identify and address racism because it perpetuates the unearned privileges of some and imposes undeserved restrictions on others. The economic well-being of a group of people is intertwined with racism and unless it is addressed intentionally and thoroughly, a community building effort will not reach its full potential.

Racial prejudice and racism have most been perpetrated in the U. However, because of the shifts in our communities' demographics in some parts of the U. No matter what culture or part of the world you're from, you've seen the results of racial prejudice and racism, even if you've never directly felt it aimed at you. The results of racial prejudice and the misconceptions of the views on diversity as a racial issue can be seen everywhere: Racial prejudice and racism can be found in many different areas of society: Here are some further reasons why racial prejudice and racism should be reduced: They impede or prevent the object of racism from achieving his or her full potential as a human being.

They impede or prevent the object of racism from making his or her fullest contribution to society.

  1. These tour and detour methods trivialize, patronize, and stereotype cultures by emphasizing traditional costumes, foods, and dances while avoiding the true picture of the everyday life of the people from that culture Derman-Sparks, 1993.
  2. Personal narrative themes of African American mothers. Critical thinking makes an integrated approach to instruction possible.
  3. What if redlining still goes on because real estate companies are filled with people who think like your colleague?
  4. Part of the problem is that the residents have not had the opportunity to debunk these stereotypes through direct interaction and contact with the day laborers and to hear their stories. Critical thinking makes an integrated approach to instruction possible.

They impede or prevent the person or group engaging in racist actions from benefiting from the potential contributions of their victim, and, as a result, weaken the community as a whole. They increase the present or eventual likelihood of retaliation by the object of racist actions.

They go against many of the democratic ideals upon which the United States and other democracies were founded. Racism is illegal, in many cases. Racial prejudice and racism feed on each other.

If racial prejudice is not reduced, it could lead to racism, and if racism is not addressed, it could lead to more prejudice.

This is why strategies to address discrimination on the basis of race should be thorough and multifaceted so that both individual attitudes and institutionalized practices are affected. In addition, here are some examples of why racial prejudice and racism should be addressed in your community building effort if more than one racial or ethnic group is involved: Every participant in the misconceptions of the views on diversity as a racial issue effort has his or her own understanding of the world and how it works.

The European American residents in the neighborhood don't understand why the new immigrants from Guatemala have to stand at the street corner to get work they are commonly referred to as day laborers. They think it is because they are either "illegal" or too lazy to find full-time jobs. Part of the problem is that the residents have not had the opportunity to debunk these stereotypes through direct interaction and contact with the day laborers and to hear their stories.

Every participant in your effort is polite, respectful, and empathetic towards each of the others, and understands that in order to address a common concern, they all have to work together; yet, they have not been able to engage a representative from the African American group in their community.

It helps to understand why African Americans have traditionally been "left out" and how important it is to keep finding ways to engage them. They come up with ideas such as hiring more culturally diverse staff, posting notices in different languages, hosting food festivals, and celebrating various cultural events.

It helps the participants to understand that even though they are taking the first steps to becoming culturally sensitive, their institutional policies may still be racist because they have not included anyone from the various racial and ethnic groups to participate in the strategic planning process, thereby not sharing their power. Addressing racial prejudice and racism also means dealing with racial exclusion and injustice. Ultimately, this means that your community building effort is promoting democracy, a value of the United States and its Constitution.

In other words, there are both moral and sometimes legal reasons to act against racism. There are also strong pragmatic reasons as well.

Diversity: Making Sense of It Through Critical Thinking

Racial prejudice and racism can harm not only the victims, but also the larger society, and indirectly the very people who are engaging in the acts.

What's more, some important new research suggests that in some cases, racist actions can cause physiological harm to the victims. For example, a recent review of physiological literature concludes: As such, intergroup and intragroup racism may play a role in the high rates of morbidity and mortality in this population. While we try not to moralize on the Community Tool Box, let's face it - racial prejudice and racism are just plain wrong.

While we try in the Community Tool Box to offer easy, step-by-step instructions for community work, changing a group of people's prejudiced attitudes and an institution's racist actions isn't so simply carried out and it doesn't happen overnight.

Reducing racial prejudice and racism is a complex task that varies from community to community, so it doesn't lend itself well to simple, 1-2-3 solutions that can be adopted and applied without having a thorough understanding of the context and environment.

Something like this takes knowing your community well and choosing strategies that best fit your community's needs, history, context, energies, and resources. With that in mind, we offer a variety of activities and strategies you can conduct in combating racial prejudice and racism so that you can decide which of these tactics might work best in your workplace, school, neighborhood, and community.

None of these activities or strategies alone will lead to sustainable change at the individual, institutional, or community levels. In order for such change to occur, you have to take actions that will allow you to consistently affect the different levels over a long period of the misconceptions of the views on diversity as a racial issue. Before you decide on the best activities and strategies, do the following: Learn about your community e. Document activities in your community that reflect racial prejudice or racism.

Documentation will show proof that there is a problem, especially when the community is in denial that racism exists. Invite a group of people to participate in the planning process, if appropriate e. Understand the depth of the problem e. Identify and understand the kinds of policies that may need to be challenged.

  • With that in mind, we offer a variety of activities and strategies you can conduct in combating racial prejudice and racism so that you can decide which of these tactics might work best in your workplace, school, neighborhood, and community;
  • Multiculturalism, Gender Issues, and Critical Thinking Multiculturalism, for example, emphasizes the importance of respecting all cultures and their unique traditions;
  • Specifically, at least 15 common misconceptions should be addressed;
  • The only way for them to develop reasoning abilities is through routine engagement in challenging reasoning tasks;
  • The study concluded that most teachers today share misconceptions about critical thinking similar to those of their professors.

Determine the short-term and long-term, if any, goals of your strategy e. Consider how far the selected strategy ies will take your community e. Consider what existing resources you can build on and what additional assistance or resources you may need e. Consider how much time you have e. Review your strategies to ensure that they deal with racial prejudice and racism at the individual, community, and institutional levels, and they link dialogue to action.